WELCOME TO DIRECT DEMOCRACY (COMMUNIST PARTY) WEB-SITE.

GREAT CONTRIBUTION TO THE CAUSE OF PRESERVING AND STRENGTHENING PEACE

The negotiations between the Government delegations of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republic and the Federal People’s Republic of Yugoslavia, which took place in an atmosphere of friendship and mutual understanding, have come to a close.

The Declaration is issued by the Government of the USSR and the FPRY is a document of immense international significance. The Declaration is a notable contribution to the cause of strengthening and friendship between the peoples of the USSR and Yugoslavia, to the cause of a peaceful settlement of international issues and of promoting understanding between peoples and sates.

Throughout their history the peoples of the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia have fought together against their common enemies on more than one occasion, and have long-established traditions of fraternal friendship. This friendship was particularly strengthened during the second world war, when they fought together against the fascist invaders. It was in that period that the closest possible relations of friendship were established between the Soviet and Yugoslav peoples.

However, subsequently these good relations became ruptured. This considerable disruption of mutual relations between the USSR and Yugoslavia brought harm to both countries and played into the hands of the enemies of peace and the security of nations. The hostile imperialist forces spared no effort to use these abnormal relations to their ends and to aggravate the discord and enmity between the fraternal peoples.

The aggressive reactionary forces hoped that the negotiations would fail, and they did all in their power to misrepresent them, to belittle their importance and discredit the foreign policy of the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia. But their hopes have been disappointed by reality, and the enemies of peace have suffered a fresh defeat.

The outcome of the Belgrade negotiations demonstrates that despite the intrigues of the hostile forces the relations of friendship and co-operation between the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia will be strengthened and further developed. There exist all the prerequisites for this: age-old historical friendship, the glorious traditions of the revolutionary movement, the existence of the necessary economic base and common ideals in the struggle for the peaceful prosperity and happiness of the working people. The sincere friendship between these two fraternal peoples has found striking expression in the warm and

hospitable reception given to the Soviet delegation in Yugoslavia.

During the negotiations the Government delegations exchanged their views on the major international problems affecting the interests of the USSR and the FPRY and examined in detail the questions of political, economic and cultural relations between the two countries.

The Declaration stresses that the negotiations have made manifest the sincere desire of the Governments of both countries for the further development of all-round co-operation between the USSR and the FPRY, which fully accords with the interests of both countries and likewise with the interests of peace and Socialism, and for which the objective conditions are now present,

“In examining the questions”, the Declaration states, “which were the subject of the negotiations, and with the aim of strengthening confidence and co-operation between the peoples, the two Governments proceed from the following principles:

“the indivisibility of peace, on which alone collective security can be based;

“respect for the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity and equality of states in their relations with each other and with other states;

“recognition and promotion of the peaceful coexistence of peoples, irrespective of heir ideological differences and differences in social structure, which presupposes co-operation between all states in the sphere of international relations in general and economic and cultural relations in particular;

“mutual respect and non-interference in internal affairs for any reason—whether economic, political or ideological—inasmuch as questions of internal organisation, differences of social systems and of concrete forms of development of Socialism are exclusively the affair of the peoples of the individual countries;

“development of bilateral and international economic co-operation and removal of all factors in economic relations which impede trade and hold back the development of productive forces both on a world and national scale;

“the rendering of assistance, through the appropriate organs of UNO as well as through other forms which conform to the principles of UNO, both to the national economy and to economically backward areas, in the interests of the peoples of those areas and of the development of world economy;

“cessation of any and, all forms of propaganda and misinformation and also of other activities which sow distrust and in one way or another impede the creation of an atmosphere favourable to constructive international co-operation and the peaceful coexistence of peoples;

“condemnation of any and all aggressions and attempts to establish political and economic domination over other countries;

“recognition of the fact that the policy of military blocs heightens international tension, undermines confidence between peoples and increases the danger of war.”

These principles are a big contribution to working out the problems of international co-operation. There is no doubt that they will meet with deep understanding among all champions of peace and will be warmly approved by all people of good will, by all those who arc striving for real co-operation between peoples.

The Declaration of the two Governments reflects such questions as the task of strengthening the role and prestige of the United Nations Organisation, according the People’s Republic of China its rightful place in UNO, and admission to membership in this Organisation of other states which meet with the requirements of the UN Charter. Both Governments, it is emphasized in the Declaration, are agreed that the peoples should exert fresh efforts to achieve positive results and agreements in negotiations on such vital questions of world peace as: the question of reduction and limitation of armaments and the prohibition of atomic weapon; the question of bringing about general collective security, including that based on a treaty for a system of collective security in Europe; and the question of the utilisation of atomic energy for peaceful purposes.

These efforts would at the same time permit the peaceful solution of such immediate, burning international questions as agreement on solution of the German question on a democratic basis and in accord with the wishes and interests of the German people, as well as the interests of general security, and the satisfaction of the lawful rights of the People’ Republic of China in reduction to Taiwan.

The Declaration defines the ways for further developing co-operation between the USSR and the FPRY, the development of economic and cultural relations between them. Both Governments have agreed to establish mutual co-operation in the sphere of utilising atomic energy for peaceful purposes. For better understanding between the peoples and development of relations between them, both Governments will maintain and facilitate the co-operation of public organisations of both countries by means of contact, exchange of socialist experience and a free exchange of opinion.

There is no doubt that the Declaration of the two Governments will be met with great satisfaction and will be warmly approved by the peoples of the Soviet Union, the Federal People’s Republic of Yugoslavia and the working people in the People’s Democracies. It is in accord with the vital interests of the working class in all countries, and in the interests of the international working-class movement as a whole. It will have the support of all peace-loving peoples because it contributes to the solution of vital present-day questions—the consolidation of peace and cooperation between the peoples, the relaxation of tension in international relations.

The Declaration of the Governments of the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia will inspire the peace-loving forces in all countries to new successes in their tireless fight for peace and the security of peoples.

DECLARATION OF THE GOVERNMENTS OF THE UNION OF SOVIET SOCIALIST REPUBLICS AND THE FEDERAL PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF YUGOSLAVIA

From May 27 to June 2, 1955, negotiations took place in Belgrade and on Brioni Island between the Government delegation of the USSR, comprising N. S. Khrushchev, Member of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR and First Secretary of the C.C. of the CPSU; N. A. Bulganin, Chairman of the Council of Minister of the USSR; A. I. Mikoyan, First Deputy Chairman of the Council of Ministers of the USSR; D. T. Shepilov, Chairman of the Foreign Affairs Commission of the Soviet of Nationalities of the Supreme Soviet, Member of the C.C. of the CPSU and Chief Editor of Pravda; A. A. Gromyko, First Deputy Foreign Minister; P. N. Kumykin, Deputy Minister of Foreign Trade; and the delegation of the Government of the Federal People’s Republic of Yugoslavia, comprising Josip Broz Tito, President of the FPRY; Edvard Kardelj, Aleksandar Rancovic and Svetozar Vukmanovic-Tempo, Vice-Chairmen of the Federal Executive Council; Mialko Todorovic, Member of the Federal Executive Council; Koca Popovic, State Secretary for Foreign Affairs, and Velko Micunovic, Deputy State Secretary for foreign Affairs of the FPRY.

In the course of the negotiations, which were conducted in a spirit of friendship and mutual understanding, there took place an exchange of opinions on international problems affecting the interests of the USSR and the FPRY, and also a comprehensive survey of questions concerning the political, economic and cultural relations between the two countries.

I.

The negotiations took as their point of departure the mutual desire of both Governments that, in the interests of the peaceful settlement of international questions and the strengthening of co-operation between peoples and states, the method of negotiations should be employed.

The peoples and armed forces of the two countries had particularly developed their friendship and militant co-operation during the war they fought together with other freedom-loving peoples against the fascist invaders.

The two Governments agreed to adopt further measures to normalise their relations and develop co-operation between their countries, confident that this accords with the interests of the peoples of both countries and contributes to the lessening of tension and the strengthening of peace throughout the world. The negotiations made manifest the sincere desire of the Governments of both countries for the further development of all-round co-operation between the USSR and the FPRY, which fully accords with the interests of both countries and likewise with the interests of peace and Socialism, and for which the objective conditions are now present.

In examining the questions which were the subject of the negotiations, and with the aim of strengthening confidence and co-operation between the peoples, the two Governments proceed from the following principles:

the indivisibility of peace, on alone collective security can be based;

respect for the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity and equality of states in their relations with each other and with other states.

recognition and promotion of the peaceful coexistence of people’s, irrespective of their ideological differences and differences in social structure, which presupposes co-operation between all states in the sphere of international relations in general and economic and cultural relations in particular;

mutual respect and non-interference in internal affairs for any reason—whether economic, political or ideological—inasmuch as questions of internal organisation, differences of social systems and of concrete forms of development of Socialism are exclusively the affair of the peoples of the individual countries;

development of bilateral and international economic co-operation and removal of all factors in economic relations impede trade and hold back the development of productive forces both on a world and national scale.

the rendering of assistance, through the appropriate organs of UNO as well as through other forms which conform to the principles of UNO, both to the national economy and to economically backward areas, in the interests of the peoples of those areas and of the development of world economy;

cessation of any and all forms of propaganda and misinformation and also of other activities which sow distrust and in one way or another impede the creation of an atmosphere favourable to constructive international co-operation and the peaceful co-existence of peoples;

condemnation of any and all aggressions and attempts to establish political and economic domination over other countries;

recognition of the fact that the policy of military blocs heightens international tension, undermines confidence between peoples and increases the danger of war.

II.

In their policy the two Governments proceed from the principles set forth in the United Nations Charter, and are agreed that it is necessary to exert further efforts to strengthen the role and authority of UNO, which would be particularly furthered were the People’s Republic of China accorded its rightful place in UNO. The admission to membership in UNO of all other states which meet with the requirements of the UN

Charter would likewise be of value.

The two Governments are agreed that all peoples should exert fresh efforts to achieve positive results and agreements in negotiations on such vital questions of world peace as: the question of reduction and limitation of armaments and the prohibition of atomic weapons; the question of bringing about general collective security, including that based on a treaty for a system of collective security in Europe, and the question of the utilisation of atomic energy for peaceful purposes.

These efforts would result in an atmosphere which at one and the same time would permit the peaceful solution of such immediate, burning international questions as agreement on solution of the German question on a democratic basis and in accord with the wishes and interests of the German people, as well as the interests of general security; and the satisfaction of the lawful rights of the Chinese People’s Republic in relation to

Taiwan.

The two Governments welcome the results of the Bandung Conference as an important contribution to the idea of international co-operation, and as giving support to the efforts of the peoples of Asia and Africa to strengthen their political and economic independence, and consider that this contributes to the strengthening of peace throughout the world.

Thorough attention was given to an analysis of the relations between the two countries up to the present time and the prospects of their further development. Taking into account that in recent years their mutual relations had been considerably disturbed, a fact which was detrimental to both countries and to international co-operation the Governments of the USSR and the Federal People’s Republic of Yugoslavia, expressing their determination to develop their future relations in a spirit of friendly co-operation and basing themselves on the principles formulated in the Declaration, have agreed on the

following:,

  1. That they shall take all necessary measure to introduce a normal treaty status, on the basis of which they will regulate and ensure the normal development of their relations for the purpose of extending co-operation between the two countries in all spheres in which both Governments are interested.

  2. The need to strengthen economic bonds and extend economic co-operation between the two countries.

To this end both Governments have agreed to undertake the necessary measures to put an end to the consequences which arose as a result of the violation of normal treaty status in economic relations between the two countries.

They have also agreed to set about concluding the necessary treaties to regulate and facilitate the development of economic relations in the above-mentioned direction.

  1. With a view to developing cultural relations, both Governments have proposed their readiness to conclude a convention on cultural co-operation.

  2. Attaching great importance to the matter of keeping the public informed, in order to develop friendly co-operation between the peoples and being desirous that this information be accurate and objective, both Governments agreed upon the necessity of concluding a convention on an information service in the spirit of the decisions of UNO and on a mutual basis from the point of view of the status and privileges of the organs of this service on the territory of each of the Contracting Parties.

  3. Supporting the UNO recommendations on the development of co-operation between all countries with regard to the use of atomic energy in peaceful purposes, which is a matter of great moment for the consolidation of peace and progress the world over, both Governments agreed to establish mutual co-operation in this sphere.

  4. Both Governments agreed to take measures to conclude treaties with a view to settling questions of citizenship or, conversely, repatriation of citizens of either of the Contracting Parties who reside on the territory of the other Party. Both Governments are agreed that the treaties must be based on respect for the principles of humanity and on the universally accepted principles of free will in relation to the persons in question.

Both Governments are also agreed with to the rights of citizens of one Contracting Party to be protected while on the territory of the other, including the right of citizens to preserve the citizenship they had before arriving on the territory of the other Contracting Party.

  1. In the spirit of the peaceful principles formulated in this Declaration, and for better mutual acquaintance and understanding between the peoples of their countries, both Governments agreed that they would support and facilitate co-operation of the public organisations, of both countries by means of contact, exchange of socialist experience and a free exchange of opinion.

  2. Both Governments agreed to exert maximum effort to carry out the tasks and provisions of this Declaration in the interests of the further development of mutual relations between the two countries and in the interest of developing international co-operation and strengthening peace the world over.

On behalf of the Government of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

N. A. BULGANIN

Chairman of the Council of Ministers of the USSR

On behalf of the Government,

of the Federal People’s Republic of Yugoslavia

J. BROZ TITO

President of the Federal People’s Republic of Yugoslavia

June 2, 1955

Belgrade

SIGNING OF THE DECLARATION AND THE GOVERNMENTS OF THE UNION OF SOCIALIST REPUBLICS AND THE FEDERAL PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF YUGOSLAVIA

The concluding meeting of the Government delegation of the USSR headed by N. S. Khrushchev and the Government delegation of Yugoslavia headed by J. Broz Tito took place, in an atmosphere of cordiality and mutual understanding, on June 2 in the House of the Guards in Belgrade.

The meeting examined and adopted the Declaration of the Governments of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the Federal People’s Republic of Yugoslavia.

The Declaration was signed in the evening of the same day in the House of the Guards in the presence of the members of the delegations of both countries, their advisers and experts and representatives of the press.

The Declaration was signed:

On behalf of the Government of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics by N. A. BULGANIN, Chairman of the Council of Ministers of the USSR.

On behalf of the Government of the Federal People’s Republic of Yugoslavia by J. BROZ TITO, President of the FPRY.

SOVIET GOVERNMENT DELEGATION IN YUGOSLAVIA

On May 27 talks began between the Government delegation of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the Government delegation of the Federal People’s Republic of Yugoslavia. The two delegations exchanged opinions on the international situation and the relations between the FPRY and the USSR.

On the same day the USSR Government delegation placed a wreath on the grave of the Unknown Soldier on Avala hill near Belgrade. The Soviet delegation visited the cemetery where lie buried the Yugoslav and Soviet servicemen who fell in the fight to liberate Belgrade. Wreaths were placed on the monuments to the fallen men. In the afternoon the Soviet delegation attended a dinner in its honour given by the President of the FPRY, Josip Broz Tito.

The talks between the two Government delegations continued on May 28 with an exchange of opinions on future relations between the FPRY and the USSR. On the same day President Tito gave a dinner in honour of the Soviet delegation.

The delegation from the USSR also visited the Boris Kidric Institute in Vinca, near Belgrade. In the evening it attended a reception given in the White Castle by President Broz Tito.

In the early hours of May 29 N. S. Khrushchev, N. A. Bulganin, A. I. Mikoyan and other members of the Soviet delegation left Belgrade by special train to pay a visit to the Island of Brioni at the invitation or the FPRY Government. Accompanying the USSR delegation on the same train were President Josip Broz Tito, Edvard Kardelj, Alexander Rankovic and other members of the Yugoslav Government delegation.

All along the route, a trip of many hours, the Soviet guests and leading Yugoslav statesmen were warmly greeted by the inhabitants of the villages and towns.

On May 29-30 the Government delegations of Yugoslavia and, the Soviet Union held further discussions on the Island of Brioni, in the course of which their exchange of opinions on relations between the USSR and the FPRY continued in an atmosphere of mutual understanding.

On May 20 the Soviet delegation, accompanied by members of the Yugoslav delegation, took a sightseeing trip around the island.

On May 30 members of the Soviet delegation and its advisers met members of the Yugoslav delegation and its advisers to discuss questions of interest to both countries. On the same day, N. S. Khrushchev and N. A. Bulganin, accompanied by J. Broz Tito, visited the ports of Pula and Ruvinj on the Istrian coast. The members of both delegations and their advisers were present at a lunch and dinner given by J. Broz Tito; President of the FPRY.

On May 31, after two days stay on the island, the Soviet Government delegation left for the port of Rijeka on the yacht “Yadranka”.

At Rijeka, members of the Soviet and Yugoslav delegations, accompanied by the heads of the Third of May Shipyard, made a round of the shops of the enterprise. N. S. Khrushchev, N. A. Bulganin and A. I. Mikoyan chatted with the heads of the enterprise and acquainted themselves with the organisation and technique of production. Members of both delegations then left by car for Postojna, in the People’s Republic of Slovenia.

On arrival, the USSR delegation and members of the Yugoslav delegation visited the famous stalactite cave in Postojna.

Members of both delegations left Postojna by car for the town of Bled. While travelling to Rijeka and Bled, members of both Government delegations continued to exchange views, in an atmosphere of mutual understanding, on the questions which formed the object of the Soviet-Yugoslav talks.

On June 1 the members of the Soviet delegation arrived in Ljubljana, the capital of the People’s Republic of Slovenia, where they visited the Litostroj Works and spoke to the management.

On the same day they left for Zagreb, the capital of the People’s Republic of Croatia.

In Zagreb the members of the Soviet delegation visited the Rade Koncar Factory.

On June 2, the Government delegation of the Soviet Union gave a dinner in honour of the Government delegation of the FPRY which took place in a cordial and friendly atmosphere.

On the same day V. A. Valkov, Ambassador of the USSR to Yugoslavia, gave a big reception in honour of the Government delegation of the Soviet Union. Among those present were the members of the Government delegation of the FPRY. The reception was held in an extremely warm and friendly atmosphere.

FOR A LASTING PEACE FOR A PEOPLES DEMOCRACY, NO. 22 (343), FRIDAY, JUNE 3, 1955, page 1.